Blog

What does a healthy work environment actually look like?

office

When you think of a healthy work environment, what do you picture? I've always imagined a fictionalized version of the Runner's World magazine office. Happy employees high five each other as they head back into the office, slightly flushed from a post-lunch team run. The light and airy kitchen is full of fruits, vegetables, and Terry in accounting's latest homemade vegan protein bars. Staff sit (and stand) at adjustable desks with cubicles full of yoga balls, foam rollers, and mason jars full of kombucha. Meetings are structured and productive, each employee's voice is valued, and creativity is encouraged. Everyone leaves at 5pm on the dot to go home and eat a wholesome meal with their friends and families.

Key Person Risk: What It Is, and How Minimizing It Can Improve Your Work/Life

Key Person

Something that's well understood, and frankly easier to do, in large corporations, is the need to reduce your dependencies. Nonprofits and small businesses, while leaner and meaner in my personal (and right) opinion, tend to dive headfirst into dependence on a few key players. This is why transitions, and VACATIONS, are so much harder in the mission-driven universe. No one can do our work for us because we are the only ones with the knowledge and tools to get it done. 

How to Set Boundaries When You Love Your Work

pretty picket fence

So we know it's important to set boundaries when we love our work, but how do we do this? In the same way that it can be tempting to go for a cookie when you're feeling that 4pm energy dip, it can be tempting to log in to your computer to do just one more thing for work at midnight. How do you fight the urge and set up healthy working habits? The same way we make any habit change: reframing our understanding, making small changes, and setting up the conditions for success.